Migration, cuisine and integration: the Anglo-Jewish cookbook from the lady to the princess

New Formations - ISSN 0950-2378
Volume 2011 Number 74

Migration, cuisine and integration: the Anglo-Jewish cookbook from the lady to the princess
Panikos Panayi, pages -

Abstract

Although cookbooks have become one of the most important of literary genres, relatively little attention has focused upon deconstructing their meaning. The vast numbers of cookbooks published allow us to identify a whole series of sub-genres. One of these consists of Anglo-Jewish cookbooks, whose origins date back to the middle of the nineteenth century. By analyzing the most important cookery books published by British women of Jewish origin over the past 160 years, this essay will demonstrate the way in which migrant cuisines are constructed by bringing together food practices in the land of origin and combining them with the eating norms of wider society in the land of settlement. The article also demonstrates the relationship between food and integration.

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To cite this article
Panikos Panayi, (2011) Migration, cuisine and integration: the Anglo-Jewish cookbook from the lady to the princess, New Formations, 2011(74), -

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