ATMs, teleprompters and photobooths: a short history of neoliberal optics

New Formations - ISSN 0950-2378
Volume 2013 Number 80

ATMs, teleprompters and photobooths: a short history of neoliberal optics
Mark Hayward, pages -

Abstract

This essay investigates three devices that were widely used beginning mid-twentieth century to explore the concept of ‘neoliberal optics’. Through a discussion of the development of the teleprompter, the self-portraiture in photobooths and automated teller machines (ATM), this paper outlines the role that optical technologies played in the development of forms of embodiment and selfhood the define neoliberal culture. This essay argues that, while the emergence of these optical technologies antedate the established chronologies of neoliberalism, they subsequently were integrated with the broader cultural project that defined has defined the neoliberal individual.

SORRY - you are not registered as being permitted online access to the full text of this article

You have the following options:

  1. If you are viewing this via an institution or academic library you can ask that your institution takes out a Subscription to this journal.
  2. If you already have a Personal Subscription please login below


    Forgotten your username / password? Click here to locate

  3. Purchase an annual Personal Subscription
    PRINT + DIGITAL personal subscription (£45 / year)
    DIGITAL personal subscription (£30 / year)
    A Personal Subscription provides immediate access not only to the single article you are seeking, but also to all past and future articles in this journal up to the expiry of your annual (calendar year) subscription.
  4. Purchase immediate access to this single article (UK£7.00) - Buy article Coming Soon

To cite this article
Mark Hayward (2013) ATMs, teleprompters and photobooths: a short history of neoliberal optics, New Formations, 2013(80), -

Share this